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Cardiovascular Diseases

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Sanofi in Egypt

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Zietoun, Cairo, Egypt
P.O. 1486

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Content :

Cardiovascular

Sanofi is committed to improving the health of men and women around the globe. That's why we hope you find the cardiovascular information on this site to be a helpful resource, and ask that you pass along our website address to your family, friends, and anyone else who is interested in a heart-healthier way of life.
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As one of the main causes of death and acquired disability, cardiovascular disease is a major healthcare priority throughout the industrialized world.


What is Cardiovascular Disease (CVD)?

CVD is the name for the group of disorders affecting the heart and blood vessels. The main forms of CVD are coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, thrombosis and peripheral artery disease (PAD). CHD and stroke are both often caused by a blockage in an artery.

Cardiovascular disease is responsible for almost 33% of deaths in France and is also the first cause of mortality in the world. However, in the last 30 years, the rate of mortality has considerable decreased in industrialized countries. Progress achieved thanks to an improved healthier lifestyle and preventative methods have allowed the reduction of risk factors.


How the Cardiovascular System Works?

The cardiovascular system serves two important functions in your body:

  • It delivers nutrients, oxygenated blood and hormones to body tissues.
  • It removes waste such as carbon dioxide and other metabolic end products from body tissues and carries them to the lungs, kidneys and liver for elimination from your body

Common Types of Heart Disease

Angina

Chest pain or discomfort in your chest is called angina. It may be caused when your heart can't get as much oxygen as it needs.

For example, when you run too fast or too long you may experience chest discomfort or shortness of breath. Your lungs can't take in as much oxygen as you're using. It's the same with angina, except that it's your heart that's not getting enough oxygen.

Angina may be a warning sign that you're at risk for heart disease or a heart attack. Medicine may be prescribed for your angina. Some medications help open up the blood vessels around your heart, while others help reduce the work your heart has to do. This lets more blood and oxygen flow to your heart and may lessen the pain of angina attacks.

Myocardial infarction (MI)

is the medical term for an event commonly known as a heart attack. It happens when blood stops flowing properly to part of the heart and the heart muscle is injured due to not enough oxygen. Usually this is because one of the coronary arteries that supplies blood to the heart develops a blockage. The event is called "acute" if it is sudden and serious.

A person having an acute myocardial infarction usually has sudden chest pain that is felt behind the breast bone and sometimes travels to the left arm or the left side of the neck. Additionally, the person may have shortness of breath, sweating, nausea, vomiting, abnormal heartbeats, and anxiety. The anxiety is often described as a "sense of impending doom." Women experience fewer of these symptoms than men, but usually have shortness of breath, weakness, a feeling of indigestion, and fatigue. In many cases, in some estimates as high as 64 percent, the person does not have chest pain or other symptoms. These are called "silent" myocardial infarctions

Hypertension

Hypertension is another name for high blood pressure. Blood pressure measures the force the blood causes as it flows through the blood vessels. When the blood vessels narrow, the heart has to work harder to push the blood through the vessels, thus raising the blood pressure.

People with high blood pressure often don't know they have it until their blood pressure is measured. Therefore, it's important to get regular medical check-ups, no matter how healthy you think you are or how good you feel. High blood pressure may have serious consequences.

You can control high blood pressure. If you have high blood pressure, have your doctor check it regularly.

Even if you felt okay before, making the changes your doctor recommends and taking your medicine may make you feel even better.


Diet and Exercise

Diet

Avoid foods that are high in fat or cholesterol, such as red meat, cheese and eggs. Similar to the way rust sticks to the inside of plumbing pipes, fat and cholesterol stick to your blood vessels, narrowing them and increasing angina pain. Ask your doctor which foods you can eat and which to cut out or limit.

Aerobics Exercises

Aerobic exercise contributes to health and helps prevent disease. It can also make you feel better. An aerobic exercise program can be tailored for any age and any health condition. Walking, using the stairs instead of elevators or escalators and even walking faster than your normal pace for longer periods all increase your heart rate and qualify as aerobics.

The recommended time for a good aerobic workout is 20 to 30 minutes, three to five days a week. This does not factor in warm-up and cool-down periods, which are crucial.

Aerobic activity trains your cardiovascular and respiratory systems to exchange oxygen more quickly and efficiently. This benefits every part of your body. Your heart muscle becomes stronger and more efficient, enabling your heart to pump a larger volume of blood with each contraction. Fewer pumps of your heart means increasing the amount of oxygen delivered to all parts of the body with less stress to your heart. An aerobically fit cardiovascular system allows you to work longer and at a more vigorous pace. The result may be a longer, healthier life.


A public health problem: Atherosclerosis and Atherothrombosis

  • Atherosclerosis is an artery ageing process with accumulation of lipids (fats) and calcium deposits. The tissue becomes fibrous resulting in a thickening and hardening of the arterial wall.
  • Atherothrombosis, in other words the formation of a blood clot in a vessel with atherosclerosis, is the cause of most cardiovascular disease. The consequences of this atherothrombosis could be the occurrence of an acute coronary accident (including myocardial infarction), cerebrovascular stroke or peripheral arterial disease.

RISK FACTORS and treatments

Numerous risk factors have been clearly identified today:

  • high blood pressure 
  • excess cholesterol 
  • diabetes 
  • smoking 
  • obesity 
  • sedentary lifestyle etc.

Smokers are more than twice as likely to suffer a heart attack than nonsmokers. Carbon monoxide and nicotine in cigarette smoke increase your risk of heart disease and stroke.
Therefore, the first prevention measure consists in following an overall healthier lifestyle.

There are effective treatments for risk factors such as high blood pressure, hypercholesterolemia and diabetes, but also to prevent and limit the accidents related to atherothrombosis.

Updated March 02, 2015